No evidence for photoinhibition of photosynthesis in alpine Caltha leptosepala DC

"Alpine plants experience high levels of insolation, as well as cold nighttime temperatures throughout the summer growth period. These two stress factors in combination are now recognized as potentially important limitations to photosynthetic carbon gain. Although likely candidates, the possibl...

Descripción completa

Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores Principales: "Sanchez, Adriana, Smith, William K."
Formato: Artículo (Article)
Lenguaje:Inglés (English)
Publicado: Birkhauser Verlag AG 2015
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/24018
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00035-015-0146-2
id ir-10336-24018
recordtype dspace
spelling ir-10336-240182020-06-03T22:15:16Z No evidence for photoinhibition of photosynthesis in alpine Caltha leptosepala DC "Sanchez, Adriana Smith, William K." Alpine plant Chlorophyll fluorescence Gas exchange Photoinhibition Xylem water potential "Alpine plants experience high levels of insolation, as well as cold nighttime temperatures throughout the summer growth period. These two stress factors in combination are now recognized as potentially important limitations to photosynthetic carbon gain. Although likely candidates, the possible occurrence of photoinhibition in alpine plants has been reported infrequently. We measured photoinhibitory stress under natural field conditions and after high-light treatments in an herbaceous species (Caltha leptosepala DC) with structural traits that appeared especially susceptible to photoinhibition, i.e., large, broad, laminar leaves with a near-horizontal leaf orientation. Although photosynthesis declined gradually during the afternoon under natural field conditions, no evidence was found for photoinhibition of photosynthesis, despite incident sunlight levels of (Formula presented.). Also, values of (Formula presented.) (an indicator of dynamic photoinhibition) changed little ( and lt;10 %) from early morning to late afternoon values. Moreover, an experimental test of photoinhibition was conducted in the field using artificially applied low (250 µmol m?2 s?1) followed by unnaturally high (3500 µmol m?2 s?1) light levels, led to only small reductions in (Formula presented.) (20 % maximum). Also, afternoon declines in photosynthesis and other gas exchange parameters were associated with significant decreases in xylem water potentials. Thus, accumulating daily water stress appeared to be a possible, greater physiological limitation than photoinhibition, even in this common, hypothetically susceptible alpine species. © 2015, Swiss Botanical Society." 2015 2020-05-26T00:07:38Z info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion 16642201 https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/24018 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00035-015-0146-2 eng info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess application/pdf Birkhauser Verlag AG instname:Universidad del Rosario reponame:Repositorio Institucional EdocUR
institution EdocUR - Universidad del Rosario
collection DSpace
language Inglés (English)
topic Alpine plant
Chlorophyll fluorescence
Gas exchange
Photoinhibition
Xylem water potential
spellingShingle Alpine plant
Chlorophyll fluorescence
Gas exchange
Photoinhibition
Xylem water potential
"Sanchez, Adriana
Smith, William K."
No evidence for photoinhibition of photosynthesis in alpine Caltha leptosepala DC
description "Alpine plants experience high levels of insolation, as well as cold nighttime temperatures throughout the summer growth period. These two stress factors in combination are now recognized as potentially important limitations to photosynthetic carbon gain. Although likely candidates, the possible occurrence of photoinhibition in alpine plants has been reported infrequently. We measured photoinhibitory stress under natural field conditions and after high-light treatments in an herbaceous species (Caltha leptosepala DC) with structural traits that appeared especially susceptible to photoinhibition, i.e., large, broad, laminar leaves with a near-horizontal leaf orientation. Although photosynthesis declined gradually during the afternoon under natural field conditions, no evidence was found for photoinhibition of photosynthesis, despite incident sunlight levels of (Formula presented.). Also, values of (Formula presented.) (an indicator of dynamic photoinhibition) changed little ( and lt;10 %) from early morning to late afternoon values. Moreover, an experimental test of photoinhibition was conducted in the field using artificially applied low (250 µmol m?2 s?1) followed by unnaturally high (3500 µmol m?2 s?1) light levels, led to only small reductions in (Formula presented.) (20 % maximum). Also, afternoon declines in photosynthesis and other gas exchange parameters were associated with significant decreases in xylem water potentials. Thus, accumulating daily water stress appeared to be a possible, greater physiological limitation than photoinhibition, even in this common, hypothetically susceptible alpine species. © 2015, Swiss Botanical Society."
format Artículo (Article)
author "Sanchez, Adriana
Smith, William K."
author_facet "Sanchez, Adriana
Smith, William K."
author_sort "Sanchez, Adriana
title No evidence for photoinhibition of photosynthesis in alpine Caltha leptosepala DC
title_short No evidence for photoinhibition of photosynthesis in alpine Caltha leptosepala DC
title_full No evidence for photoinhibition of photosynthesis in alpine Caltha leptosepala DC
title_fullStr No evidence for photoinhibition of photosynthesis in alpine Caltha leptosepala DC
title_full_unstemmed No evidence for photoinhibition of photosynthesis in alpine Caltha leptosepala DC
title_sort no evidence for photoinhibition of photosynthesis in alpine caltha leptosepala dc
publisher Birkhauser Verlag AG
publishDate 2015
url https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/24018
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00035-015-0146-2
_version_ 1669098520357896192
score 11,828437