Thinking with (il)legality: The ethics of living with bonanzas

"By thinking with (il)legality, I show the everyday rhythms and tropes of cultivation and mule driving through which peasants explain their engagements with different legal and illegal economies (marijuana, coca, and tourism) on a coastal mountainside in Colombia. I explore how peasants engage...

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Autor Principal: Bocarejo Suescún, Diana
Formato: Artículo (Article)
Lenguaje:Inglés (English)
Publicado: University of Chicago Press 2018
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/23798
https://doi.org/10.1086/696160
id ir-10336-23798
recordtype dspace
spelling ir-10336-237982021-08-18T04:21:28Z Thinking with (il)legality: The ethics of living with bonanzas Bocarejo Suescún, Diana Thinking with (il)legality ethics living bonanzas "By thinking with (il)legality, I show the everyday rhythms and tropes of cultivation and mule driving through which peasants explain their engagements with different legal and illegal economies (marijuana, coca, and tourism) on a coastal mountainside in Colombia. I explore how peasants engage in ethical deliberations drawn from everyday practices through which they try to live “the best possible life” in very volatile contexts, while also providing a trenchant critique of the state, legality, and corruption. In this community, the talk about and pragmatic use of (il)legality and corruption are full of judgments about the right, the good, and the decent, or at least “the better than.” I analyze how law and electoral politics, the state and the judiciary, are not where peasants chiefly look for their theories of right and wrong. Peasants perceive corruption as practices shaped within the law, especially when the law does not comply with the legitimate claims of fairness or justice. Illegality may be an unexpected consequence of otherwise ethical judgments, but corruption, in contrast, is not redeemable. The distance that campesinos feel from corruption is not a triumphalist account of their ethical authority but instead marks the impossibility of their inclusion in either petty clientelism or urban middle-class anti-corruption platforms. © 2018 by The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research." 2018 2020-05-26T00:05:28Z info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion 00113204 15375382 https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/23798 https://doi.org/10.1086/696160 eng info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess application/pdf University of Chicago Press instname:Universidad del Rosario reponame:Repositorio Institucional EdocUR
institution EdocUR - Universidad del Rosario
collection DSpace
language Inglés (English)
topic Thinking
with
(il)legality
ethics
living
bonanzas
spellingShingle Thinking
with
(il)legality
ethics
living
bonanzas
Bocarejo Suescún, Diana
Thinking with (il)legality: The ethics of living with bonanzas
description "By thinking with (il)legality, I show the everyday rhythms and tropes of cultivation and mule driving through which peasants explain their engagements with different legal and illegal economies (marijuana, coca, and tourism) on a coastal mountainside in Colombia. I explore how peasants engage in ethical deliberations drawn from everyday practices through which they try to live “the best possible life” in very volatile contexts, while also providing a trenchant critique of the state, legality, and corruption. In this community, the talk about and pragmatic use of (il)legality and corruption are full of judgments about the right, the good, and the decent, or at least “the better than.” I analyze how law and electoral politics, the state and the judiciary, are not where peasants chiefly look for their theories of right and wrong. Peasants perceive corruption as practices shaped within the law, especially when the law does not comply with the legitimate claims of fairness or justice. Illegality may be an unexpected consequence of otherwise ethical judgments, but corruption, in contrast, is not redeemable. The distance that campesinos feel from corruption is not a triumphalist account of their ethical authority but instead marks the impossibility of their inclusion in either petty clientelism or urban middle-class anti-corruption platforms. © 2018 by The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research."
format Artículo (Article)
author Bocarejo Suescún, Diana
author_facet Bocarejo Suescún, Diana
author_sort Bocarejo Suescún, Diana
title Thinking with (il)legality: The ethics of living with bonanzas
title_short Thinking with (il)legality: The ethics of living with bonanzas
title_full Thinking with (il)legality: The ethics of living with bonanzas
title_fullStr Thinking with (il)legality: The ethics of living with bonanzas
title_full_unstemmed Thinking with (il)legality: The ethics of living with bonanzas
title_sort thinking with (il)legality: the ethics of living with bonanzas
publisher University of Chicago Press
publishDate 2018
url https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/23798
https://doi.org/10.1086/696160
_version_ 1712098449466327040
score 11,828437