Can appropriate systemic treatment help protect the cornea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A multidisciplinary approach to autoimmune ocular involvement

Purpose: To correlate rheumatologic with ophthalmic and laboratory findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to identify what effect these have on development of ocular disease. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 172 eyes of 86 patients with RA. Patients were examined by a group o...

Descripción completa

Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores Principales: Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J, Jalil-Florencia, Emilio, Otero-Marquez, Oscar, Mantilla, Ruben D, Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana, Anaya, Juan-Manuel, Barraquer-Coll, Carmen, Molano-González, Nicolas
Formato: Artículo (Article)
Lenguaje:Inglés (English)
Publicado: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins 2018
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/23778
https://doi.org/10.1097/ICO.0000000000001467
id ir-10336-23778
recordtype dspace
spelling ir-10336-237782022-05-02T12:37:13Z Can appropriate systemic treatment help protect the cornea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A multidisciplinary approach to autoimmune ocular involvement Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J Jalil-Florencia, Emilio Otero-Marquez, Oscar Mantilla, Ruben D Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana Anaya, Juan-Manuel Barraquer-Coll, Carmen Molano-González, Nicolas Abatacept Antimalarial agent Azathioprine Corticosteroid Disease modifying antirheumatic drug Leflunomide Methotrexate Rheumatoid factor Salazosulfapyridine Tocilizumab Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor Antirheumatic agent Immunosuppressive agent Article Cell count Cornea Cornea endothelium Cross-sectional study Disease activity score Disease duration Eye disease Eye protection Female Human Keratoconus Keratometry Major clinical study Male Ophthalmology Priority journal Rheumatoid arthritis Scleritis Systemic therapy Tear osmolarity Adult Aged Analysis of variance Chemistry Complication Cornea Cornea disease Cytology Endothelium cell Lacrimal fluid Middle aged Pathology Rheumatoid arthritis Risk factor Adult Aged Analysis of variance Antirheumatic agents Cell count Cornea Corneal diseases Corneal topography Cross-sectional studies Endothelial cells Female Humans Immunosuppressive agents Male Middle aged Risk factors Tears Collagenolysis Cornea Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs Keratoconus Rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid Arthritis Purpose: To correlate rheumatologic with ophthalmic and laboratory findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to identify what effect these have on development of ocular disease. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 172 eyes of 86 patients with RA. Patients were examined by a group of rheumatologists. Sociodemographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. All patients underwent complete ophthalmologic examination including corneal topography and endothelial cell count. Results: There was no significant correlation between RA-negative prognostic indicators (NPIs) and pathologic corneal findings. Patients using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and antimalarial drugs had greater corneal volumes (mean difference 8.51 mm3, 90% confidence interval [CI], 3.98-13.04, P = 0.004; and 2.24, 90% CI, 0.32-4.54, P = 0.048, respectively). Patients using azathioprine had lower endothelial cell counts compared with those using other drugs (mean difference 180 cells/mm2, 90% CI, 69-291, P = 0.008). Patients using biologic DMARDs had better tear osmolarity values (between 280 and 300 mOsm/L) than patients not using them (mean difference 14.3 mOsm/L, P = 0.022). There was no correlation between NPIs of RA and positive keratoconus screening indices (Spearman correlation OD -0.013, P = 0.91; OS -0.033, P = 0.76). Conclusions: There was no clear correlation between RA-NPIs and pathologic corneal findings in our study. DMARDs treatment may help maintain corneal integrity in our patients and prevented collagenolytic manifestations of RA. Other medications such as azathioprine should be used carefully, as endothelial damage may potentially occur. Copyright © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. 2018 2020-05-26T00:05:19Z info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion 2773740 https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/23778 https://doi.org/10.1097/ICO.0000000000001467 eng info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess application/pdf Lippincott Williams and Wilkins instname:Universidad del Rosario
institution EdocUR - Universidad del Rosario
collection DSpace
language Inglés (English)
topic Abatacept
Antimalarial agent
Azathioprine
Corticosteroid
Disease modifying antirheumatic drug
Leflunomide
Methotrexate
Rheumatoid factor
Salazosulfapyridine
Tocilizumab
Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor
Antirheumatic agent
Immunosuppressive agent
Article
Cell count
Cornea
Cornea endothelium
Cross-sectional study
Disease activity score
Disease duration
Eye disease
Eye protection
Female
Human
Keratoconus
Keratometry
Major clinical study
Male
Ophthalmology
Priority journal
Rheumatoid arthritis
Scleritis
Systemic therapy
Tear osmolarity
Adult
Aged
Analysis of variance
Chemistry
Complication
Cornea
Cornea disease
Cytology
Endothelium cell
Lacrimal fluid
Middle aged
Pathology
Rheumatoid arthritis
Risk factor
Adult
Aged
Analysis of variance
Antirheumatic agents
Cell count
Cornea
Corneal diseases
Corneal topography
Cross-sectional studies
Endothelial cells
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive agents
Male
Middle aged
Risk factors
Tears
Collagenolysis
Cornea
Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs
Keratoconus
Rheumatoid arthritis
rheumatoid
Arthritis
spellingShingle Abatacept
Antimalarial agent
Azathioprine
Corticosteroid
Disease modifying antirheumatic drug
Leflunomide
Methotrexate
Rheumatoid factor
Salazosulfapyridine
Tocilizumab
Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor
Antirheumatic agent
Immunosuppressive agent
Article
Cell count
Cornea
Cornea endothelium
Cross-sectional study
Disease activity score
Disease duration
Eye disease
Eye protection
Female
Human
Keratoconus
Keratometry
Major clinical study
Male
Ophthalmology
Priority journal
Rheumatoid arthritis
Scleritis
Systemic therapy
Tear osmolarity
Adult
Aged
Analysis of variance
Chemistry
Complication
Cornea
Cornea disease
Cytology
Endothelium cell
Lacrimal fluid
Middle aged
Pathology
Rheumatoid arthritis
Risk factor
Adult
Aged
Analysis of variance
Antirheumatic agents
Cell count
Cornea
Corneal diseases
Corneal topography
Cross-sectional studies
Endothelial cells
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive agents
Male
Middle aged
Risk factors
Tears
Collagenolysis
Cornea
Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs
Keratoconus
Rheumatoid arthritis
rheumatoid
Arthritis
Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J
Jalil-Florencia, Emilio
Otero-Marquez, Oscar
Mantilla, Ruben D
Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana
Anaya, Juan-Manuel
Barraquer-Coll, Carmen
Molano-González, Nicolas
Can appropriate systemic treatment help protect the cornea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A multidisciplinary approach to autoimmune ocular involvement
description Purpose: To correlate rheumatologic with ophthalmic and laboratory findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to identify what effect these have on development of ocular disease. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 172 eyes of 86 patients with RA. Patients were examined by a group of rheumatologists. Sociodemographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. All patients underwent complete ophthalmologic examination including corneal topography and endothelial cell count. Results: There was no significant correlation between RA-negative prognostic indicators (NPIs) and pathologic corneal findings. Patients using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and antimalarial drugs had greater corneal volumes (mean difference 8.51 mm3, 90% confidence interval [CI], 3.98-13.04, P = 0.004; and 2.24, 90% CI, 0.32-4.54, P = 0.048, respectively). Patients using azathioprine had lower endothelial cell counts compared with those using other drugs (mean difference 180 cells/mm2, 90% CI, 69-291, P = 0.008). Patients using biologic DMARDs had better tear osmolarity values (between 280 and 300 mOsm/L) than patients not using them (mean difference 14.3 mOsm/L, P = 0.022). There was no correlation between NPIs of RA and positive keratoconus screening indices (Spearman correlation OD -0.013, P = 0.91; OS -0.033, P = 0.76). Conclusions: There was no clear correlation between RA-NPIs and pathologic corneal findings in our study. DMARDs treatment may help maintain corneal integrity in our patients and prevented collagenolytic manifestations of RA. Other medications such as azathioprine should be used carefully, as endothelial damage may potentially occur. Copyright © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
format Artículo (Article)
author Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J
Jalil-Florencia, Emilio
Otero-Marquez, Oscar
Mantilla, Ruben D
Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana
Anaya, Juan-Manuel
Barraquer-Coll, Carmen
Molano-González, Nicolas
author_facet Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J
Jalil-Florencia, Emilio
Otero-Marquez, Oscar
Mantilla, Ruben D
Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana
Anaya, Juan-Manuel
Barraquer-Coll, Carmen
Molano-González, Nicolas
author_sort Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J
title Can appropriate systemic treatment help protect the cornea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A multidisciplinary approach to autoimmune ocular involvement
title_short Can appropriate systemic treatment help protect the cornea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A multidisciplinary approach to autoimmune ocular involvement
title_full Can appropriate systemic treatment help protect the cornea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A multidisciplinary approach to autoimmune ocular involvement
title_fullStr Can appropriate systemic treatment help protect the cornea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A multidisciplinary approach to autoimmune ocular involvement
title_full_unstemmed Can appropriate systemic treatment help protect the cornea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A multidisciplinary approach to autoimmune ocular involvement
title_sort can appropriate systemic treatment help protect the cornea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? a multidisciplinary approach to autoimmune ocular involvement
publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
publishDate 2018
url https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/23778
https://doi.org/10.1097/ICO.0000000000001467
_version_ 1740172775844216832
score 12,111491