Stereotypes about Old Age, Social Support, Aging Anxiety and Evaluations of One's Own Health

"As the aging population in Colombia grows, caring for older adults falls not just to family but also to the community including friends and religious organizations. While there is very little research on ageism in Colombia, it is increasingly urgent to understand the role of social support of...

Descripción completa

Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores Principales: Ramirez, Luisa, Palacios-Espinosa, Ximena
Formato: Artículo (Article)
Lenguaje:Inglés (English)
Publicado: Blackwell Publishing Inc. 2016
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/22457
https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12155
id ir-10336-22457
recordtype dspace
spelling ir-10336-224572021-06-11T03:56:32Z Stereotypes about Old Age, Social Support, Aging Anxiety and Evaluations of One's Own Health Ramirez, Luisa Palacios-Espinosa, Ximena Aging population Elderly care Mental health Psychology Bogota Colombia "As the aging population in Colombia grows, caring for older adults falls not just to family but also to the community including friends and religious organizations. While there is very little research on ageism in Colombia, it is increasingly urgent to understand the role of social support of the growing older population. Two studies were conducted with a community sample in Bogotá, Colombia. In a pilot study, we developed a measure of positive and negative stereotyping of older adults. In the main study with participants aged between 54 and 83, we explored the relations among endorsement of positive and negative stereotypes, anxiety about aging, perceived and expected physical and mental health, and expectations of social support. We found that perceived lack of social support and negative stereotyping significantly predict more anxiety towards aging, while positive evaluations of one's own mental health predict less anxiety. Surprisingly, greater expectations of social support predict more aging anxiety. In turn, aging anxiety and positive stereotyping predicted evaluations of mental (but not physical) health. Additionally, poorer evaluations of physical health, aging anxiety and negative stereotyping (though only marginally) significantly predict greater expectations of social support. Implications of the findings are discussed. © 2016 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues." 2016 2020-05-25T23:56:33Z info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion 00224537 15404560 https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/22457 https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12155 eng info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess application/pdf Blackwell Publishing Inc. instname:Universidad del Rosario reponame:Repositorio Institucional EdocUR
institution EdocUR - Universidad del Rosario
collection DSpace
language Inglés (English)
topic Aging population
Elderly care
Mental health
Psychology
Bogota
Colombia
spellingShingle Aging population
Elderly care
Mental health
Psychology
Bogota
Colombia
Ramirez, Luisa
Palacios-Espinosa, Ximena
Stereotypes about Old Age, Social Support, Aging Anxiety and Evaluations of One's Own Health
description "As the aging population in Colombia grows, caring for older adults falls not just to family but also to the community including friends and religious organizations. While there is very little research on ageism in Colombia, it is increasingly urgent to understand the role of social support of the growing older population. Two studies were conducted with a community sample in Bogotá, Colombia. In a pilot study, we developed a measure of positive and negative stereotyping of older adults. In the main study with participants aged between 54 and 83, we explored the relations among endorsement of positive and negative stereotypes, anxiety about aging, perceived and expected physical and mental health, and expectations of social support. We found that perceived lack of social support and negative stereotyping significantly predict more anxiety towards aging, while positive evaluations of one's own mental health predict less anxiety. Surprisingly, greater expectations of social support predict more aging anxiety. In turn, aging anxiety and positive stereotyping predicted evaluations of mental (but not physical) health. Additionally, poorer evaluations of physical health, aging anxiety and negative stereotyping (though only marginally) significantly predict greater expectations of social support. Implications of the findings are discussed. © 2016 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues."
format Artículo (Article)
author Ramirez, Luisa
Palacios-Espinosa, Ximena
author_facet Ramirez, Luisa
Palacios-Espinosa, Ximena
author_sort Ramirez, Luisa
title Stereotypes about Old Age, Social Support, Aging Anxiety and Evaluations of One's Own Health
title_short Stereotypes about Old Age, Social Support, Aging Anxiety and Evaluations of One's Own Health
title_full Stereotypes about Old Age, Social Support, Aging Anxiety and Evaluations of One's Own Health
title_fullStr Stereotypes about Old Age, Social Support, Aging Anxiety and Evaluations of One's Own Health
title_full_unstemmed Stereotypes about Old Age, Social Support, Aging Anxiety and Evaluations of One's Own Health
title_sort stereotypes about old age, social support, aging anxiety and evaluations of one's own health
publisher Blackwell Publishing Inc.
publishDate 2016
url https://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/22457
https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12155
_version_ 1702626584440078336
score 11,828437