Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial

Exercise training is effective for improving cardiometabolic health and physical fitness in inactive adults. However, limited research has been conducted on the optimal exercise training intensity for this population. We investigate the effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise trai...

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Autor Principal: Hernández Quiñonez, Paula Andrea
Otros Autores: Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
Formato: Tesis de maestría (Master Thesis)
Lenguaje:Español (Spanish)
Publicado: Universidad del Rosario 2016
Materias:
Acceso en línea:http://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/13140
id ir-10336-13140
recordtype dspace
institution EdocUR - Universidad del Rosario
collection DSpace
language Español (Spanish)
topic Endothelial function
Varias ramas de la medicina, Cirugía
Entrenamiento
Actividad motora
Ejercicio
Entrenamiento
Enfermedades cardiovasculares
spellingShingle Endothelial function
Varias ramas de la medicina, Cirugía
Entrenamiento
Actividad motora
Ejercicio
Entrenamiento
Enfermedades cardiovasculares
Hernández Quiñonez, Paula Andrea
Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial
description Exercise training is effective for improving cardiometabolic health and physical fitness in inactive adults. However, limited research has been conducted on the optimal exercise training intensity for this population. We investigate the effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function and physical fitness in physically inactive adults. Twenty inactive adults were randomly allocated to receive either moderate intensity training (MCT group) or high intensity interval training (HIT group). The MCT group performed aerobic training at an intensity of 55-75% of the walking on a treadmill at 60-80% heart rate max (HRmax) until expenditure of 300 kcal until the end of training. The HIT group performed running on a treadmill during 4 minutes at 85-95% peak HRmax and had a recovery of 4 minutes at 65% peak HRmax until expenditure of 300 kcal until the end of training. Vascular function (flow-mediated vasodilation, FMD [%], aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV [m·s−1]), blood lipids [fasting glucose, triacylglycerol, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol], blood pressure, and physical fitness (Muscle strength (handgrip [kg]), exercise capacity (V̇O2peak and graded exercise test duration [minutes]), were measured at baseline and 12-weeks thereafter. Trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02738385, registered on 23 March 2016.
author2 Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
author_facet Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
Hernández Quiñonez, Paula Andrea
format Tesis de maestría (Master Thesis)
author Hernández Quiñonez, Paula Andrea
author_sort Hernández Quiñonez, Paula Andrea
title Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial
title_short Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial
title_full Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial
title_fullStr Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial
title_full_unstemmed Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial
title_sort effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial
publisher Universidad del Rosario
publishDate 2016
url http://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/13140
_version_ 1645141574547406848
spelling ir-10336-131402019-09-19T12:37:54Z Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial Hernández Quiñonez, Paula Andrea Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson Correa Bautista, Jorge Enrique Endothelial function Varias ramas de la medicina, Cirugía Entrenamiento Actividad motora Ejercicio Entrenamiento Enfermedades cardiovasculares Exercise training is effective for improving cardiometabolic health and physical fitness in inactive adults. However, limited research has been conducted on the optimal exercise training intensity for this population. We investigate the effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function and physical fitness in physically inactive adults. Twenty inactive adults were randomly allocated to receive either moderate intensity training (MCT group) or high intensity interval training (HIT group). The MCT group performed aerobic training at an intensity of 55-75% of the walking on a treadmill at 60-80% heart rate max (HRmax) until expenditure of 300 kcal until the end of training. The HIT group performed running on a treadmill during 4 minutes at 85-95% peak HRmax and had a recovery of 4 minutes at 65% peak HRmax until expenditure of 300 kcal until the end of training. Vascular function (flow-mediated vasodilation, FMD [%], aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV [m·s−1]), blood lipids [fasting glucose, triacylglycerol, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol], blood pressure, and physical fitness (Muscle strength (handgrip [kg]), exercise capacity (V̇O2peak and graded exercise test duration [minutes]), were measured at baseline and 12-weeks thereafter. Trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02738385, registered on 23 March 2016. 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