Triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses percentiles and cut-offs for overweight and obesity in a population-based sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia

OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to establish a Colombian smoothed centile charts and LMS tables for tríceps, subscapular and sum tríceps+subscapular skinfolds; appropriate cut-offs were selected using receiver operating characteristic analysis based in a populationbased sample of schoolch...

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Autor Principal: Lopez Cifuentes, Mario Ferney
Otros Autores: Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
Formato: Tesis de maestría (Master Thesis)
Lenguaje:Español (Spanish)
Publicado: Universidad del Rosario 2016
Materias:
Acceso en línea:http://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/12403
id ir-10336-12403
recordtype dspace
institution EdocUR - Universidad del Rosario
collection DSpace
language Español (Spanish)
topic Percentile Curves
Children and Adolescents
Obesity
Skinfold Thickness
Promoción de salud
Ejercicio
Actividad motora
Entrenamiento
Sobrepeso
Desarrollo infantil
spellingShingle Percentile Curves
Children and Adolescents
Obesity
Skinfold Thickness
Promoción de salud
Ejercicio
Actividad motora
Entrenamiento
Sobrepeso
Desarrollo infantil
Lopez Cifuentes, Mario Ferney
Triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses percentiles and cut-offs for overweight and obesity in a population-based sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia
description OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to establish a Colombian smoothed centile charts and LMS tables for tríceps, subscapular and sum tríceps+subscapular skinfolds; appropriate cut-offs were selected using receiver operating characteristic analysis based in a populationbased sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia and to compare them with international studies. METHODS: A total of 9 618 children and adolescents attending public schools in Bogota, Colombia (55.7% girls; age range of 9–17.9 years). Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements were obtained using standardized methods. We have calculated tríceps+subscapular skinfold (T+SS) sum. Smoothed percentile curves for triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were derived by the LMS method. Receiver operating characteristics curve (ROC) analyses were used to evaluate the optimal cut-off point of tríceps, subscapular and sum tríceps+subscapular skinfolds for overweight and obesity based on the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) definitions. Data were compared with international studies. RESULTS: Subscapular, triceps skinfolds and T+SS were significantly higher in girls than in boys (P <0.001). The median values for triceps, subscapular as well as T+SS skinfold thickness increased in a sex-specific pattern with age. The ROC analysis showed that subscapular, triceps skinfolds and T+SS have a high discrimination power in the identification of overweight and obesity in the sample population in this study. Based on the raw non-adjusted data, we found that Colombian boys and girls had high triceps and subscapular skinfolds values than their counterparts from Spain, UK, German and US. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide sex- and age-specific normative reference standards for the triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness values in a large, population-based sample of 3 schoolchildren and adolescents from an Latin-American population. By providing LMS tables for Latin-American people based on Colombian reference data, we hope to provide quantitative tools for the study of obesity and its complications.
author2 Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
author_facet Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
Lopez Cifuentes, Mario Ferney
format Tesis de maestría (Master Thesis)
author Lopez Cifuentes, Mario Ferney
author_sort Lopez Cifuentes, Mario Ferney
title Triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses percentiles and cut-offs for overweight and obesity in a population-based sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia
title_short Triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses percentiles and cut-offs for overweight and obesity in a population-based sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia
title_full Triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses percentiles and cut-offs for overweight and obesity in a population-based sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia
title_fullStr Triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses percentiles and cut-offs for overweight and obesity in a population-based sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia
title_full_unstemmed Triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses percentiles and cut-offs for overweight and obesity in a population-based sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia
title_sort triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses percentiles and cut-offs for overweight and obesity in a population-based sample of schoolchildren in bogota, colombia
publisher Universidad del Rosario
publishDate 2016
url http://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/12403
_version_ 1645142442885775360
spelling ir-10336-124032019-09-19T12:37:54Z Triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses percentiles and cut-offs for overweight and obesity in a population-based sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia Lopez Cifuentes, Mario Ferney Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson Correa Bautista, Jorge Enrique Percentile Curves Children and Adolescents Obesity Skinfold Thickness Promoción de salud Ejercicio Actividad motora Entrenamiento Sobrepeso Desarrollo infantil OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to establish a Colombian smoothed centile charts and LMS tables for tríceps, subscapular and sum tríceps+subscapular skinfolds; appropriate cut-offs were selected using receiver operating characteristic analysis based in a populationbased sample of schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia and to compare them with international studies. METHODS: A total of 9 618 children and adolescents attending public schools in Bogota, Colombia (55.7% girls; age range of 9–17.9 years). Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements were obtained using standardized methods. We have calculated tríceps+subscapular skinfold (T+SS) sum. Smoothed percentile curves for triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were derived by the LMS method. Receiver operating characteristics curve (ROC) analyses were used to evaluate the optimal cut-off point of tríceps, subscapular and sum tríceps+subscapular skinfolds for overweight and obesity based on the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) definitions. Data were compared with international studies. RESULTS: Subscapular, triceps skinfolds and T+SS were significantly higher in girls than in boys (P <0.001). The median values for triceps, subscapular as well as T+SS skinfold thickness increased in a sex-specific pattern with age. The ROC analysis showed that subscapular, triceps skinfolds and T+SS have a high discrimination power in the identification of overweight and obesity in the sample population in this study. Based on the raw non-adjusted data, we found that Colombian boys and girls had high triceps and subscapular skinfolds values than their counterparts from Spain, UK, German and US. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide sex- and age-specific normative reference standards for the triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness values in a large, population-based sample of 3 schoolchildren and adolescents from an Latin-American population. By providing LMS tables for Latin-American people based on Colombian reference data, we hope to provide quantitative tools for the study of obesity and its complications. Universidad del Rosario 2016-08-19 2016-10-12T18:56:58Z info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion http://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/12403 spa http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/co/ info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess application/pdf Universidad del Rosario Maestría en Actividad Física y Salud Facultad de medicina instname:Universidad del Rosario reponame:Repositorio Institucional EdocUR 1 Selassie M, Sinha AC. The epidemiology and aetiology of obesity: a global challenge. Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol 2011; 25: 1–9. 2 Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Executive Summary of The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). JAMA 2001; 285: 2486–2497. 3 World Health Organization. Obesity: preventing and managing the global epidemic. 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