Reference values for handgrip strength in among healthy young adults

Background: Isometric grip strength, evaluated with a handgrip dynamometer, is a marker of current nutritional status and cardiometabolic risk and future morbidity and mortality. We present reference values for handgrip strength in healthy young Colombian adults (aged 18 to 29 years). Methods: The...

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Autores Principales: Vivas, Andrés, Correa Bautista, Jorge Enrique, Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
Formato: Tesis de maestría (Master Thesis)
Lenguaje:Español (Spanish)
Publicado: Universidad del Rosario 2015
Materias:
Acceso en línea:http://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/11974
id ir-10336-11974
recordtype dspace
institution EdocUR - Universidad del Rosario
collection DSpace
language Español (Spanish)
topic Adultos
Dinamómetro
Fuerza de presión
Valores de referencia
Fisiología humana
Alta presión::Mediciones
Adults
Dynamometer
Grip strength
Reference values
Contracción isométrica -- estudio de casos
Presión Sanguínea
spellingShingle Adultos
Dinamómetro
Fuerza de presión
Valores de referencia
Fisiología humana
Alta presión::Mediciones
Adults
Dynamometer
Grip strength
Reference values
Contracción isométrica -- estudio de casos
Presión Sanguínea
Vivas, Andrés
Correa Bautista, Jorge Enrique
Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
Reference values for handgrip strength in among healthy young adults
description Background: Isometric grip strength, evaluated with a handgrip dynamometer, is a marker of current nutritional status and cardiometabolic risk and future morbidity and mortality. We present reference values for handgrip strength in healthy young Colombian adults (aged 18 to 29 years). Methods: The sample comprised 5.647 (2.330 men and 3.317 women) apparently healthy young university students (mean age, 20.6±2.7 years) attending public and private institutions in the cities of Bogota and Cali (Colombia). Handgrip strength was measured two times with a TKK analogue dynamometer in both hands and the highest value used in the analysis. Sex- and age-specific normative values for handgrip strength were calculated using the LMS method and expressed as tabulated percentiles from 3 to 97 and as smoothed centile curves (P3, P10, P25, P50, P75, P90 and P97). Results: Mean values for right and left handgrip strength were 38.1±8.9 and 35.9±8.6 kg for men, and 25.1±8.7 and 23.3±8.2 kg for women, respectively. Handgrip strength increased with age in both sexes and was significantly higher in men in all age categories. The results were generally more homogeneous amongst men than women. Conclusions: Sex- and age-specific handgrip strength normative values among healthy young Colombian adults are defined. This information may be helpful in future studies of secular trends in handgrip strength and to identify clinically relevant cut points for poor nutritional and elevated cardiometabolic risk in a Latin American population. Evidence of decline in handgrip strength before the end of the third decade is of concern and warrants further investigation
author2 Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
author_facet Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
Vivas, Andrés
Correa Bautista, Jorge Enrique
Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
format Tesis de maestría (Master Thesis)
author Vivas, Andrés
Correa Bautista, Jorge Enrique
Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson
author_sort Vivas, Andrés
title Reference values for handgrip strength in among healthy young adults
title_short Reference values for handgrip strength in among healthy young adults
title_full Reference values for handgrip strength in among healthy young adults
title_fullStr Reference values for handgrip strength in among healthy young adults
title_full_unstemmed Reference values for handgrip strength in among healthy young adults
title_sort reference values for handgrip strength in among healthy young adults
publisher Universidad del Rosario
publishDate 2015
url http://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/11974
_version_ 1645142002505875456
spelling ir-10336-119742019-09-19T12:37:54Z Reference values for handgrip strength in among healthy young adults Vivas, Andrés Correa Bautista, Jorge Enrique Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson Adultos Dinamómetro Fuerza de presión Valores de referencia Fisiología humana Alta presión::Mediciones Adults Dynamometer Grip strength Reference values Contracción isométrica -- estudio de casos Presión Sanguínea Background: Isometric grip strength, evaluated with a handgrip dynamometer, is a marker of current nutritional status and cardiometabolic risk and future morbidity and mortality. We present reference values for handgrip strength in healthy young Colombian adults (aged 18 to 29 years). Methods: The sample comprised 5.647 (2.330 men and 3.317 women) apparently healthy young university students (mean age, 20.6±2.7 years) attending public and private institutions in the cities of Bogota and Cali (Colombia). Handgrip strength was measured two times with a TKK analogue dynamometer in both hands and the highest value used in the analysis. Sex- and age-specific normative values for handgrip strength were calculated using the LMS method and expressed as tabulated percentiles from 3 to 97 and as smoothed centile curves (P3, P10, P25, P50, P75, P90 and P97). Results: Mean values for right and left handgrip strength were 38.1±8.9 and 35.9±8.6 kg for men, and 25.1±8.7 and 23.3±8.2 kg for women, respectively. Handgrip strength increased with age in both sexes and was significantly higher in men in all age categories. The results were generally more homogeneous amongst men than women. Conclusions: Sex- and age-specific handgrip strength normative values among healthy young Colombian adults are defined. This information may be helpful in future studies of secular trends in handgrip strength and to identify clinically relevant cut points for poor nutritional and elevated cardiometabolic risk in a Latin American population. Evidence of decline in handgrip strength before the end of the third decade is of concern and warrants further investigation Background: Isometric grip strength, evaluated with a handgrip dynamometer, is a marker of current nutritional status and cardiometabolic risk and future morbidity and mortality. We present reference values for handgrip strength in healthy young Colombian adults (aged 18 to 29 years). Methods: The sample comprised 5.647 (2.330 men and 3.317 women) apparently healthy young university students (mean age, 20.6±2.7 years) attending public and private institutions in the cities of Bogota and Cali (Colombia). Handgrip strength was measured two times with a TKK analogue dynamometer in both hands and the highest value used in the analysis. Sex- and age-specific normative values for handgrip strength were calculated using the LMS method and expressed as tabulated percentiles from 3 to 97 and as smoothed centile curves (P3, P10, P25, P50, P75, P90 and P97). Results: Mean values for right and left handgrip strength were 38.1±8.9 and 35.9±8.6 kg for men, and 25.1±8.7 and 23.3±8.2 kg for women, respectively. Handgrip strength increased with age in both sexes and was significantly higher in men in all age categories. The results were generally more homogeneous amongst men than women. Conclusions: Sex- and age-specific handgrip strength normative values among healthy young Colombian adults are defined. This information may be helpful in future studies of secular trends in handgrip strength and to identify clinically relevant cut points for poor nutritional and elevated cardiometabolic risk in a Latin American population. 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